VOICE holds Vietnam accountable to human rights agreements on mid-term campaign

VOICE delegation at the UN office in Geneva. From left to right: Anna Nguyen, Le Thi Minh Ha, and Dinh Thao. Source: VietnamUPR Facebook page

Haiy Le, October 9, 2017: When the human rights group, Vietnamese Overseas Initiative for Conscience Empowerment (VOICE), sent a delegation to the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2014, the delegation was made up of three men and all were citizens of Vietnam. This year, the trio is all female.

“We did not purposely want to have a female delegation,” said Anna Nguyen, Director of Programs at VOICE. A more interesting point, she explained, are the different backgrounds — and continents — the three women come from. Anna is a lawyer born and raised in Australia. Joining her is Le Thi Minh Ha, the wife of blogger Nguyen Huu Vinh who was sentenced in March 2016 to five years in prison by the Vietnamese government for founding and operating a successful independent news blog. The third member is Dinh Thao, a Vietnamese citizen who left her career as a medical doctor to become an activist working out of VOICE’s headquarters in the Philippines and is now stationed in Belgium as the European Union Program Coordinator.

As activists waging a long war against Vietnam’s authoritarian government, they are unbothered by the comments littered on the VOICE Facebook page calling them “dogs” and “liars” who should “die.” The group suspects the comments come from hacks paid by the Vietnamese government. In the spirit of free expression though, the malicious comments are free to stay. It’s the opposite of what Hanoi is doing.

In 2017 alone, Vietnam’s one-party Communist government has detained or sentenced 16 activists under the country’s draconian penal code, and specifically Article 88, which makes it a crime to “propagate” against the government. Human Rights Watch has reported on the country’s long history limiting freedom of expression, which has sent more than 100 activists to prisons. The country’s repression has led to thousands of refugees seeking political freedoms and economic opportunities to live and work elsewhere under more democratic and transparent governance.

VOICE was founded in 1997 as a legal aid office in the Philippines to help stateless Vietnamese refugees resettle in countries, including Australia, the U.S. and Canada. Since then, the nonprofit’s mission has branched out to include advocacy for human rights and the rule of law in Vietnam.

Anna’s career has evolved somewhat similarly. She began her career as a refugee lawyer in Australia where for three years she worked with asylum seekers from Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam. “That’s when I started to learn about the human rights situation in Vietnam. Instead of helping people leave the country, I wanted to explore why people were leaving in the first place. The war ended in 1975 but why are people still leaving?”

Since joining VOICE in 2014, Anna’s work includes communicating with foreign governments and multilateral organizations, and persuading them to use their influence to put pressure on Vietnam. She also makes sure these foreign bodies hear from independent activists and civil society groups in Vietnam. “Many of these activists are banned from traveling and don’t have a platform, so it’s great that we can give them a voice,” she said.

In 2014, a 23-member delegation from Hanoi met with the U.N. Human Rights Council for the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), a review process on the human rights records of all UN Member States. The Vietnamese government agreed to the implementation of some UPR recommendations and rejected others, notably the release of prisoners and the revision of vague national security laws that are used to suppress human rights.

The goals of this year’s Mid-term UPR Advocacy Campaign are to follow up on the recommendations and to advocate for the prisoners, particularly Tran Huynh Duy Thuc, a technology entrepreneur and blogger who was sentenced to 16 years for “conducting activities aimed at overthrowing the people’s administration” on January 2010; Nguyen Ngoc Nhu Quynh, better known by her pen name, Mother Mushroom, is a blogger convicted of “anti state propaganda” on June 2017 and sentenced to ten years’ imprisonment; and Tran Thi Nga, a blogger sentenced to nine years’ imprisonment on July 2017 for “anti state propaganda” in her sharing of articles and videos highlighting abuses tied to environmental crises and political corruption. In the past couple of months, there has been a rise in the number of female activists targeted by the government. Mother Mushroom wrote that she was motivated to create a better future for her two children.

The mid-term campaign, which runs from September 15 through October 10, has been in the planning stages since the last UPR. The delegation has organized a marathon of meetings with foreign bodies in Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, Norway, Belgium and the Czech Republic to give suggestions on how these groups can exert pressure on Hanoi.

In a recent case that has made headlines for its Cold War style of abductions, a Vietnamese asylum seeker was snatched off the streets of Berlin in broad daylight on August 24 — one day before his asylum hearing — and whisked back to Vietnam on corruption charges. In a meeting with Germany’s Office of Foreign Affairs on September 15, VOICE raised concerns to Annette Knobloch, Deputy Head of Unit of South East Asia/Pacific.

“We made them a number of suggestions and then a few days after our meeting, it was announced in the news that Germany had expelled another diplomat,” Anna said.

As Vietnam’s biggest trading partner in the EU, Germany has influential leverage through its purse strings. There’s also Germany’s development aid to Vietnam, which in 2015 was $257 million distributed over two years.

On top of the meetings with Germany and other foreign governments, the delegates have communicated with UN Special Rapporteur on human rights defender, Michel Forst, and CIVICUS, a group working to strengthen civil society. VOICE’s collaboration with CIVICUS, which has consultative status with the UN, gave VOICE the opportunity to present in front of the UN Human Rights Council on September 19.

“We call on the Vietnamese government to implement in good faith the UPR recommendations it accepted in 2014,” Thao read in her statement. “We call on the UN Member States to urge Vietnam to free all prisoners of conscience.”

Thao said the presentation alone has made the 25-day campaign a successful one for her, in spite of the stressful logistics, the back-to-back meetings and the harassment from the Vietnamese government that she, her colleagues and family in Vietnam have received due to her activism.

After the campaign ends, the delegates plan to follow up on the meetings and maintain the contacts they met. “It’s really easy to meet people but if there’s nothing done after that, there’s no point in meeting them,” Anna acknowledged. They will also start making plans for the 3rd UPR in January 2019, which will involve more people, workshops and a UN session dedicated to addressing Vietnam’s human rights situation.

Being a human rights defender is like running in a marathon, Anna described. “You cannot expect to see the finish line straight away. It’s hard and arduous, and you will need to eventually pass on the baton to your comrades and colleagues. But like all marathons, you will eventually see the finish line.”

Haiy Le is a freelance journalist and previously worked at the San Francisco Chronicle and Newsela. She grew up listening to her father’s stories from the the Vietnam War and became more interested in Vietnamese foreign affairs while studying International Relations and Communication at Stanford University. Follow her @HaiyLe

© 2017 The 88 Project

 

Blogger Mẹ Nấm – người luôn vắng mặt khi được quốc tế vinh danh

Giải Phụ nữ Can đảm Quốc tế của Bộ Ngoại Giao Hoa Kỳ năm nay vừa vinh danh 13 người phụ nữ hoạt động vì quyền con người từ nhiều nước trên thế giới, trong đó có Blogger Mẹ Nấm hay Nguyễn Ngọc Như Quỳnh của Việt Nam.

Phụ nữ Can đảm Quốc tế

Từ năm 2007, cùng với Giải Phụ nữ Can đảm Quốc tế (International Women of Courage Award), Ngoại trưởng Mỹ đã tôn vinh nhiều phụ nữ trên toàn cầu, những người đã thể hiện lòng dũng cảm và khả năng lãnh đạo trong các nỗ lực vận động cho nhân quyền, bình đẳng giới và quyền phụ nữ. Giải này đặc biệt vinh danh những phụ nữ từng bị tống giam, tra tấn, bị đe dọa tới tính mạng hoặc chịu tổn thương nghiêm trọng vì đã đứng lên đấu tranh cho công lý, nhân quyền và pháp trị.

Trong thông báo của Đại sứ Hoa Kỳ tại Việt Nam có đoạn: “Vào ngày 29/3, Bộ Ngoại giao Hoa Kỳ sẽ vinh danh bà Nguyễn Ngọc Như Quỳnh với Giải Phụ nữ Can đảm Quốc tế của Bộ Ngoại giao Hoa Kỳ vì sự can trường của bà trong cuộc đấu tranh cho các vấn đề xã hội dân sự, vì đã truyền cảm hứng cho những thay đổi ôn hòa, kêu gọi một hệ thống chính quyền minh bạch hơn, cổ vũ cho hoà bình, công lý và quyền con người, và là tiếng nói đại diện cho quyền tự do ngôn luận.”

Tạ Phong Tần, một cựu tù nhân lương tâm nổi tiếng, từng được vinh danh trong Giải này năm 2013 khi bà đang chịu án tù 10 năm tại Việt Nam vì tội danh “tuyên truyền chống nhà nước”.

Người luôn vắng mặt

Blogger Mẹ Nấm gây chú ý trong giải thưởng năm nay, không chỉ bởi chị là người nhận giải duy nhất vắng mặt tại buổi lễ mà còn là người duy nhất đang bị giam cầm.

Blogger Mẹ Nấm – người luôn vắng mặt khi được quốc tế vinh danh
Blogger Mẹ Nấm bị bắt tháng 10 năm 2016

Tháng 10 năm 2016, Nguyễn Ngọc Như Quỳnh bị công an Khánh Hòa bắt với cáo buộc “tuyên truyền chống phá nhà nước” theo Điều 88, Bộ Luật Hình sự Việt Nam. Trong khi những ‘chứng cứ phạm tội’ thu giữ tại nhà chị chỉ là những biểu ngữ như “Cá cần nước sạch, Nước cần minh bạch”, “Khởi tố Formosa”, các khẩu hiệu chống Trung Quốc xâm lược, cùng tập hồ sơ với dữ liệu về 31 người chết trong khi bị công an giam giữ được tổng hợp từ báo chí nhà nước.

Năm 2015, chị Quỳnh là phụ nữ Châu Á đầu tiên được nhận giải thưởng Người bảo vệ Dân quyền của tổ chức Civil Rights Defenders có trụ sở tại Thụy Điển. Tuy nhiên do bị cấm xuất cảnh chị cũng chỉ có thể nhận giải thưởng “từ xa”.

Năm 2010, Mẹ Nấm được tổ chức Human Rights Watch trao giải thưởng Hellman/Hammett nhằm tôn vinh lòng can đảm trong các nỗ lực bảo vệ nhân quyền.

Mẹ của bé Nấm

Chị Nguyễn Ngọc Như Quỳnh, bút danh Mẹ Nấm, sinh năm 1979, quê ở Nha Trang – Khánh Hòa.

Chị Quỳnh dùng truyền thông xã hội để phản đối bất công, tham nhũng, và vi phạm nhân quyền tại Việt Nam, đấu tranh cho những người không có tiếng nói trong xã hội… qua những bài viết blog từ năm 2006. Chị bị bắt giữ nhiều lần từ 2009 – 2016 liên quan đến các hoạt động vừa nêu, lần gần đây nhất là từ tháng 10/2016 cho đến nay.

Từ ngày chị Quỳnh bị bắt đi, những người trong gia đình luôn phải sống trong một nỗi sợ hãi, thấp thỏm. Hai con của chị, bé Nấm trở nên lầm lũi ít nói, còn bé Gấu liên tục khóc đòi mẹ và giục bà gọi mẹ về. “Cuộc sống của chúng tôi thật sự khó khăn và bị đe dọa khi thiếu vắng Quỳnh,” bà Lan, mẹ của chị Quỳnh, chia sẻ.

Blogger Mẹ Nấm – người luôn vắng mặt khi được quốc tế vinh danh
Mẹ già và hai con nhỏ của chị Quỳnh

Bà Lan cho rằng con bà vô tội nếu sống trong một quốc gia tự do, nhân quyền được tôn trọng. Và đối với bà, đó cũng chính là ý nghĩa cốt lõi của Giải Phụ nữ Can đảm Quốc tế mà Bộ Ngoại giao Mỹ trao tặng con gái bà năm nay. Theo trao đổi của bà với Đài VOA.

Giám đốc điều hành tổ chức VOICE Luật sư Trịnh Hội cảm thấy vui khi hay tin Mẹ Nấm nhận được giải thưởng từ Bộ ngoại giao Hoa Kỳ tuy nhiên “điều đó chỉ nói lên một sự thật đó là còn quá nhiều sự bất công, đàn áp nhân quyền ở Việt Nam”. “Mỗi người trong chúng ta cần phải cố gắng nhiều hơn nữa trong công việc tranh đấu cho những tù nhân lương tâm của Việt Nam trong đó có Mẹ Nấm” ông nói thêm.

VOICE đã có dịp quen biết và làm việc với Blogger Mẹ Nấm trước khi chị bị bắt. Hiện nay, VOICE vẫn tiếp tục vận động với các giới chức và tổ chức quốc tế để nhiều người biết hơn về việc làm của chị. Cũng như giúp đỡ cho gia đình của chị, đặc biệt là hai bé Nấm và Gấu tuổi còn quá nhỏ mà đã phải sống xa mẹ, không được gặp mẹ từ lúc mẹ bị bắt.