Việt – Thái Refugee recap

40 years since the end of the Vietnam War and over 20 years after being stranded in Thailand, the last remaining Vietnamese Boat People have been accepted into Canada! The group is to be resettled in Vancouver, Edmonton, Ottawa, Calgary and Toronto – on 13 November 2014, the first group of 28 individuals arrived in Canada, the second group of 39 individuals joined them on 25 November 2014. The remaining families will be arriving in Canada later in 2015.

VOICE Haiyan Relief Projects

” Following the devastation of Super-typhoon Haiyan in November 2013, VOICE and supporters all over the world led a fundraising campaign which resulted in over $500,000 USD being donated for the victims of the typhoon. After months of providing emergency relief, VOICE worked with local organizations to help rebuild schools, medical centers and provide for the livelihoods for 2 cities: Ormoc and Coron. The opening ceremony for the schools was held in November 2014, marking one year since the typhoon. We would like to thank all the supporters and friends for the continued support for the Philippines.”

“May we shelter you as you have sheltered us in our times of need”

Joint statement by Australian organisations and community groups 13 February 2015 NEVER AGAIN: LET’S END THE DETENTION OF CHILDREN ONCE AND FOR ALL

“VOICE Australia is 1 of over 200 groups to sign onto a statement to call for the cessation of detaining asylum children. This joint letter follows the release this week of the Australian HR Commission’s report on kids in detention.”

The  report  of  the  Australian  Human  Rights  Commission’s  National  Inquiry  into  Children  in Immigration  Detention  provides  compelling  evidence  of  the  need  for  Australia  to  cease  the
detention of children once and for all. Drawing on  interviews in detention facilities with more than 1000 children and their parents, the report offers a deeply disturbing record of the harm inflicted on so many children by successive governments. The Government, Opposition and all members of the Australian Parliament must take immediate action to ensure that all children are released from Australian-funded detention centres, in Australia and Nauru, and to ensure that these policies are never repeated.

The indefinite mass detention of children is a national disgrace for which both of Australia’s major political parties bear responsibility. Under the Rudd and Gillard Governments, record numbers of children  were  detained,  reaching  a  peak  of  1,992  in July  2013.  Under  the  Abbott  Government, hundreds  of  children  have  experienced  prolonged  detention,  with  the  average  time  spent  in detention rising from three months in August 2013 to more than 14 months in January 2015. In doing this, governments have ignored numerous reports, including from the Commission’s previous national inquiry in 2004, which have outlined detention’s shocking impacts on the mental health of children.

At the public hearings conducted as part of the inquiry, previous Ministers for Immigration Chris Bowen and Scott Morrison both acknowledged that thedetention of children was not an effective
mechanism for deterring boat arrivals or preventingdeaths at sea.

1
Without a clear policy purpose, it is bewildering that this deeply harmful and exorbitantly costly practice has continued for so long. For more than a decade under successive governments, we have watched Australia’s detention policies  go  through  the  same  cycle:  people  are  kept in  indefinite  detention  unnecessarily  for prolonged periods until the human and financial costs of doing so become so high as to compel the Government to make greater use of community-based alternatives. It is high time that we put an end to this cycle.

Australia is the only country in the world to detain children as its first option. In the United Kingdom, for example, the number of children simultaneously in UK immigration detention over the past three years  has  not  exceeded  four,  a  tiny  fraction  of  the number  detained  by  Australia.
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The  United Kingdom  also  has  legislative  limits  on  the  detention  of  children  which  restrict  the  detention  of families with children in pre-removal centres to a maximum of 72 hours, or seven days if authorised by the responsible minister.

Effective alternatives to detention already exist in Australia – and have done so for a decade. We urge the Australian Government to expand the use ofthese alternatives, ensure that they are used
routinely  for  children  and  families  and  develop  safe  alternatives  to  detention  for  children  now detained in Nauru.

We  reject  the  argument  that  the  welfare  of  asylum  seeker  children  sent  to  Nauru  is  the  sole responsibility of the Government of Nauru. The harmbeing inflicted on children detained there is a
1
Former Immigration Minister Chris Bowen said that detention was “not an effective deterrent” and thatthe “cost on children was too great for any deterrence value”. See Bowen, Chris, Testimony at the AHRC Public Hearings on 9 September 2014 (page 1), available at https://www.humanrights.gov.au/sites/default/files/Hon%20Chris%20Bowen.pdf; When asked if the “purpose of long-term detention[is] to deter people from coming to Australia by boat?”, MinisterScott Morrison said “no”. See Morrison, Scott, Testimony at the AHRC Public Hearings on 22 August 2014 (page 25), available at https://www.humanrights.gov.au/sites/default/files/Hon%20Scott%20Morrison%20Mr%20Bowles.pdf
2
A comparison of quarterly statistics for the detention of children in Australia and the UK from 2012 to 2014, compiled by Refugee Council of Australia, can be found at http://bit.ly/1CcOG6a.
page 2 direct result of Australia’s actions. Australia wasresponsible for sending children and their families to Nauru against their will, in full knowledge thatthey would face prolonged indefinite detention.

Australia remains responsible for funding the detention centre in Nauru; indeed, without Australia’s support, the centre would cease to operate. After  the  Commission’s  2004  report  into  the  detention  of  children,  the  Australian  Government pledged  that  children  would  be  detained  only  as  a  last  resort.  As  the Commission’s  new  report clearly  shows,  such  non-binding  political  promises  are  meaningless.  We  urge  the  Australian Parliament to:
1.  Introduce legislation to prevent children from being detained for immigration purposes in the future.
2.  End  the  offshore  processing  of  asylum  claims  and return  all  asylum  seekers  currently subject to offshore processing to Australia, prioritising children and their families.
3.  Refer allegations of child sexual abuse in Australian-funded detention centres to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. As the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child has  ruled, “the detention of a child because of their or their parent’s migration status constitutes a child rights violation and always contravenes the principle of the best interests of the child.”
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So long as Australia continues to detain children as a  measure  of  first  rather  than  last  resort;  so  long as  our  laws  fail  to  protect  children  against prolonged indefinite detention; so long as any child remains in detention as a result of Australia’s actions, we will be failing in our duty to protect the best interests of children in our care.

We  have  comprehensive,  consistent  and  irrefutable  evidence  of  the  harm  caused  by  prolonged indefinite detention. We have practical, humane andeffective solutions at our disposal. It’s time to end the detention of children once and for all. It’s time to stand up and say: never again.
This statement is supported by:
Refugee Council of Australia (statement coordinator)
A Just Cause
ACT Council of Social Service
ActionAid Australia
Adventist Development and Relief Agency Australia
Ahmadiyya Muslim Association of Australia
Aireys Inlet Rural Australians for Refugees
Amnesty International Australia
Anglican Social Responsibilities Commission, Diocese of Perth
Apollo Bay Rural Australians for Refugees
Asia Pacific Journalism Centre
Association for Services to Torture and Trauma Survivors (ASeTTS)
Association for the Wellbeing of Children in Health
Asylum Insight
Asylum Seeker Resource Centre
Asylum Seekers Centre
Auburn Diversity Services Inc
Australian Afghan Hassanian Youth Association
Australian Anti-Bases Campaign Coalition
Australian Baptist Ministries
Australian Catholic Migrant and Refugee Office
Australian Catholic Social Justice Council
Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce
Australian Coalition to End Immigration Detention of Children
Australian Council For International Development
Australian Council of Social Service
Australian Council of Trade Unions
Australian Doctors International
3
Committee on the Rights of the Child, The Rights of all Children in the Context of International Migration: Report of the 2012 Day of General
Discussion, paragraph 78, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/docs/discussion2012/ReportDGDChildrenAndMigration2012.pdf
page 3
Australian Jewish Democratic Society
Australian Lasallian (Asia-Pacific) Foundation
Australian Lutheran World Service
Australian National Committee on Refugee Women
Australian Refugee Association
Australia-Tamil Solidarity
Ballarat Catholic Diocesan Social Justice Commission
Ballarat Community Health
Balmain for Refugees
Baptcare (Victoria and Tasmania)
Baptist Care Australia
Baptistcare Incorporated (WA)
Bayside Refugee and Advocacy Association
Bellarine for Refugees
Blue Mountains Refugee Support Group
B’nai B’rith Australia/New Zealand
Border Crossing Observatory, Monash University
Braidwood Rural Australians for Refugees
Bridge for Asylum Seekers Foundation
Brigidine Asylum Seekers Project
Brisbane Refugee and Asylum Seeker Support Network (BRASS)
Broadway and Glebe Catholic Social Justice Group
Burmese Rohingya Community in Australia
Campus Refugee Rights Club, University of Melbourne
Canberra Refugee Support
Caritas Australia
Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne, Office of Justice and Peace
Catholic Diocese of Parramatta, Social Justice Office
Catholic Diocese of Toowoomba, Social Justice Commission
Catholic Immigration Office (Sydney)
Catholic Justice and Peace Commission, Archdiocese of Brisbane
Catholic Social Justice Commission, Archdiocese of Canberra-Goulburn
Catholic Social Services Australia
Catholics in Coalition for Justice and Peace
Centacare South West NSW
Central Victorian Refugee Support Network
Centre for Advocacy Support and Education for Refugees
Centre for Human Rights Education, Curtin University
Centre for Multicultural Youth
Centre for Refugee Research, University of NSW
Centrecare (WA)
ChildFund Australia
Children’s Healthcare Australasia
Children’s Rights International
ChilOut
Christian Brothers Oceania
Christian Brothers Tasmania
Coalition for Asylum Seekers, Refugees and Detainees
Coalition for Justice and Peace in Palestine (Sydney)
cohealth
Combined Refugee Action Group
Common Grace
Communicare
Community Migrant Resource Centre
Conference of Leaders of Religious Institutes in NSW
Council of Social Service of NSW
Cyber Christian Community WA
Darwin Asylum Seekers’ Support and Advocacy Network
Daughters of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Overseas Aid Fund
Domestic Violence Service Management
page 4
Dominican Sisters of Eastern Australia and the Solomon Islands
Edmund Rice Centre Mirrabooka
Edmund Rice Centre Sydney
Edmund Rice Network Tasmania
Ethnic Communities’ Council of Victoria
Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Councils of Australia
Federation of Liberian Communities in Australia
FHEAL Foundation
Fitzroy Learning Network
Geelong Interchurch Social Justice Network
Geelong Refugee Action and Information Network
Global Campaign to End Immigration Detention of Children
God’s Dwelling Place Bethany City Church
Habitat for Humanity Australia
Help – Himalayan Youth Foundation
Horn of Africa Relief and Development Agency
House of Hospitality, Broadmeadow (NSW)
House of Welcome
House of Welcome Ballarat
Humanitarian Research Partners
Hunter Ecumenical Social Justice Network
Immigration Advice and Rights Centre
Independent and Peaceful Australia Network (NSW)
Indigenous Social Justice Association
International Commission of Jurists Australia
International Detention Coalition
International Society for Human Rights – Australia
Islamic Council of Victoria
Islamic Relief Australia
Jesuit Refugee Service Australia
Jesuit Social Services
Josephite Community Aid
Justice Connect
Justice for Palestine Matters, Sydney
Justice, Ecology and Development Office, Catholic Archdiocese of Perth
Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Commission, Carmelites of Australia and Timor Leste
Kommonground
Labor for Refugees
Lentara UnitingCare
Loddon Campaspe Multicultural Services
Loreto Sisters of Australia and South East Asia
MacKillop Family Services
Marist Sisters
Marrickville Peace Group
Melaleuca Refugee Centre
Mercy Community Services
Mercy Works
Migrant Resource Centre of South Australia
Missionaries of the Sacred Heart Justice and Peace Centre
Multicultural Council of Tasmania
Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network Australia
Nonlethal Security for Peace Campaign
Northern Settlement Services
NSW Teachers Federation
NT Council of Social Service
Occupational Opportunities for Refugees and Asylum Seekers
Oromia Support Group Australia
Oxfam Australia
Partners Relief and Development Australia
Pax Christi Australia
page 5
Pax Christi Queensland
Pax Christi Victoria
Peace and Justice Commission, NSW Ecumenical Council
Peace and Social Justice Network, Religious Societyof Friends (Quakers)
Plan International Australia
Presentation People’s Social Justice Group, Ballina
Presentation Sisters Lismore
Presentation Sisters Queensland
Presentation Sisters Wagga Wagga
Quakers, WA Regional Meeting
Queenscliff Rural Australians for Refugees
Refugee Advice and Casework Service
Refugee Advocacy Network
Refugee and Immigration Legal Centre
Rural Australians for Refugees, Bendigo
Rural Australians for Refugees, Daylesford and District
Safe Asylum
Salvation Army – Eastern Territory
Sanctuary Australia Foundation
Save the Children Australia
SCALES Community Legal Centre
SCARF Inc, Illawarra
Settlement Council of Australia
Settlement Services International
Sisters of St Joseph
Sisters of the Good Samaritan
Sisters of the Little Company of Mary, Australia
Social Justice Ministry, Catholic Parish of Chatswood
Sophia’s Spring Uniting Church, East Brunswick
Spring Creek Community House
St Bede’s Social Justice Group, Braidwood
St Vincent de Paul Society National Council of Australia
Stand Up: Jewish Commitment to a Better World
Surf Coast Rural Australians for Refugees
Sydney Justice and Peace Coalition
Sydney Multicultural Community Services
Tasmanian Asylum Seeker Support
Tasmanian Catholic Justice and Peace Commission
Tasmanian Council of Social Service
The Grail Australia (NSW)
The Tasmania Opportunity
Townsville Multicultural Support Group
Trinity Aid for Refugees
Union of Australian Women Victoria
Uniting Church in Australia
Victorian Council of Social Service
Vietnamese Overseas Initiative for Conscience Empowerment (VOICE) Australia
WA Council of Social Service
Warrnambool Rural Australians for Refugees
West Wagga San Isidore Refugee Committee
Western Sydney Community Forum
Women and the Australian Church
Women’s Health in the South East
World Wellness Group Ltd

Freedom at Last (cập nhật danh sách quyên góp)

Nam Lộc

Không ai có thể ngờ được câu nói lịch sử của Mục Sư Martin Luther King, nhà tranh đấu cho nhân quyền nổi tiếng ở Hoa Kỳ hơn nửa thế kỷ trước, mà nay lại được 28 người tỵ nạn Việt Nam reo vang trên đất nước Canada để diễn tả niềm vui sướng cùng tâm trạng của mình khi họ vừa đặt chân đến bến bờ tự do trong vòng tay ân cần và thương mến của cộng đồng người Việt tại thành phố Vancouver vào lúc 4 giờ chiều Thứ Năm, 13 tháng 11, 2014 vừa qua.

Read More

Vietnam Prepares for UN Human Rights Review, Activists Lobby for Pressure

Tra Mi, Trung Nguyen/VOA – Representatives from the Vietnamese government will appear before the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva Wednesday for a review of its human rights record amid mounting criticism that Hanoi does not tolerate opposition voices.

Rolando Gomez, spokesman for the council, told VOA’s Vietnamese service the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), which takes place every four years, is “a significant occasion for Vietnam.”

“It will provide a unique opportunity for the government of Vietnam to spell out what steps they have taken in the country to advance human rights,” he said. “The idea would also be for them to spell out the challenges that remain.  It is also an opportunity for other U.N. member states to propose recommendations to Vietnam in a constructive manner.”

Meanwhile, activists who accuse Vietnam of conducting a crackdown on critics are also gathering in Geneva to offer their perspective and put pressure on Hanoi.

Blogger Nguyen Anh Tuan said a delegation of activists is meeting this week with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and other U.N. bodies.

“This is the first time a delegation of rights defenders from Vietnam has made such a campaign trip to Western countries to provide the international community with real facts and information on human rights in Vietnam,” said Tuan. “We hope the international community will make greater efforts in pushing Hanoi to respect and improve human rights.”

Another critic of the government in Hanoi is Dang Xuong Hung, a former Vietnamese diplomat who is seeking asylum in Switzerland.  Dang, who left his post in Geneva after withdrawing from the Vietnamese Communist Party in 2012, says minor reforms will not be enough.

“I would like the world to pay closer attention to Vietnam’s human rights to help bring Vietnam back to the international community, back to the civilized world, and to a brighter future,” said Hung.

Last year, Vietnam was chosen to join the U.N. rights body in a move that angered many activists, who said Hanoi should first improve its record.

Hanoi, which has said it has full respect for human rights, has dismissed the activists’ attempt to pressure the government.  Deputy Prime Minister Pham Binh Minh was recently quoted by local media as saying that “there are forces and people who always attempt to criticize Vietnam to serve their own purposes.”

(This report was produced in collaboration with the VOA Vietnamese service.)

Press release: Activists start UPR tour around the world

12/1/2014 – Invited by the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and other INGOs, a delegation advocating for human rights in Vietnam will visit the United States, Europe, and Australia starting from 12 January 2014. The delegation consists of representatives from VOICE, Vietnamese Bloggers Network, Dan Lam Bao, the Vietnam Path Movement, Hoa Hao Buddhist Church, No-U Vietnam, the Association of Political and Religious Prisoners, and relatives of current political prisoners in Vietnam.

The delegation will meet with OHCHR and other UN bodies related to the upcoming Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Vietnam which will take place on February 5, 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland, a process that occurs every four (4) years. In addition, the delegation will meet with representatives of the US Congress and Department of State, the European Union Parliament, the Australian Parliament, Amnesty International, Frontline Defenders, International Service for Human Rights (ISHR), and other INGOs as well as the overseas Vietnamese communities. Furthermore, the delegation will participate in side events related to the UPR with representatives from the Permanent Missions in Geneva, international human rights organizations and the media.

With assistance from OHCHR and the international organizations mentioned above, this delegation consisting of Vietnamese activists from in and outside of the country, aims to provide full and accurate information on the current human rights situation in Vietnam. It is hoped that our advocacy will inspire further changes resulting in the Vietnamese Government to respect and protect human rights as a new member state of the Human Rights Council.

For more information regarding the delegation and its activities, please contact our representative, Ms Ann Pham at +1.714.325.8276 or vietnamupr@gmail.com.

SIGNED:
Vietnamese Bloggers Network
Dan Lam Bao
Vietnam Path Movement
Hoa Hao Buddhist Church
No-U Vietnam
Association of Political and Religious Prisoners of Vietnam
VOICE

Project Freedom at Last

PRESS RELEASE

First three of 100 Vietnamese refugee families stranded
in the Philippines for almost 20 years arriving 
in Calgary and Vancouver

Three Vietnamese refugee families will finally arrive in Canada to begin their new lives after being stranded in the Philippines for almost 20 years: one family in Calgary on March 6, and two families in Vancouver on March 7.

Following the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, an estimated million and a half people fled the newly established Communist regime in Vietnam, mostly by the sea, in small leaky boats, to neighbouring countries. About half a million of these people never made it to the shore of freedom, having perished at sea, due to starvation or drowning in the rough, treacherous South China Sea, or having been killed by pirates. Among those lucky enough to survive this ordeal, about one hundred families remain stranded in the Philippines because no country wanted to accept them.

On May 10, 2007, after 5 years of working with lawyer Hoi Trinh, a Vietnamese-Australian refugee rights advocate, and the SOS VietPhi Refugee Support Group, the Vietnamese Canadian Federation succeeded in obtaining a special arrangement with the federal government, whereby the government would facilitate the immigration of these people based on humanitarian and compassionate consideration. Those who do not qualify for admission to Canada under either the Family Class or the Federal Skilled Worker Class would be assessed based on this consideration.

Following this arrangement, the Vietnamese Canadian Federation established Project Freedom at Last and worked with VOICE (Vietnamese Overseas Initiative for Conscience Empowerment), a non-profit and charitable organization with offices in Washington, D.C., and Manila, and other Vietnamese – Canadian organizations, to assist these refugees with their application process and their resettlement in Canada.

So far, over $500,000 has been raised in Canada, the U.S., and Australia, and 41 community supported groups formed across the country to help these refugees rebuild their lives. At present, 24 families and individuals have been issued entry visas and three first families will arrive this week: one, sponsored by their relatives, will resettle in Calgary and the other two supported by the Hoa Nghiem Buddhist Temple in Vancouver.

Mr. Ed Komarniki, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, will be on hand to greet the two families arriving inVancouver, on behalf of the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Diane Finley.

“Our government and our Prime Minister support the Vietnamese community in Canada and we are pleased to welcome these Vietnamese families to our country,” said Minister Finley. “We would also like to commend the Vietnamese Canadian Federation for their efforts to organize community support across Canada.”

On behalf of the Vietnamese community in Canada and elsewhere, the Vietnamese Canadian Federation wishes to thank all those who have helped make this happen. Special thanks are extended to Minister Finley, Members of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration under the current and previous Parliaments for their continuing support, and to all those who have made generous financial contributions to Project Freedom at Last.

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For immediate release: March 6, 2008
Can D. Le
General Coordinator, Project Freedom at Last
Vietnamese Canadian Federation
Tel. (613) 230-8282